Modeling Headshot Tips: Variety is Key

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

Happy Wednesday to you all!  I am pleased to share with you a new set of modeling headshots that I took of aspiring model, April.  The photos were shot lakeside in Winter Haven, Florida.  We had great light, and were able to capture the natural beauty that was all around us.

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A few modeling headshot tips for anyone jumping in front of the camera: variety is indeed the spice of life.  No photographer wants to click away at the same pose, either in the body or face.  When you are in front of the camera, movement is key to keeping the eye of your audience engaged.  Static poses are just not that eye catching.  Rather, try twisting your body a bit in order to create diagonal lines and movement.

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

Further, make sure that you vary your facial expressions.  We’ve all seen photos of new models where, though the hands and feet may be in different locations with each shot, the face stays the same.  Again, not eye catching to agents or clients who will be hiring you.  Pay special attention to your mouth and your eyes.  Your eyes should show the emotion you are trying to evoke, and your mouth should follow.

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

I always recommend models and actors to practice, practice, practice in front of the mirror.  Get to know the angles of your face to figure out what works and what doesn’t.  Then, as hard as it may seem, try to memorize your moves so that you can do the same thing in front of the camera.  Remember, it is a photographer — and not a magician — who will be taking your photo.  It takes two to tango, and while I will certainly give you direction in terms of where the light is best and what looks good through my lens, it’s up to you to do your part and provide the movement and variety to help you look your best.

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

Finally, pay attention to the pacing of your pose changes.  It usually takes a few minutes to get used to how fast or slow a photographer takes her or his shots, but once you get the rhythm down, you should switch poses with every click.  When in doubt, move slower than usual so you can make sure that the photographer has the shot.  Make your poses changes incremental so that if the photographer likes a particular move, you can recreate it quickly.

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

A photo by NYC headshot photographer, Kelly Williams, to accompany an article on modeling headshot tips

If you would like to view more recent modeling headshots, please visit my website portfolio.


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